Are VR & AR Tools Under your Company’s Radar?

There is always a lot of discussion of when and how AR and VR will finally take off. Some say it is in the process already and others predict 20 years from now. These conversations always come back to headsets, cables and content, among other things that get in the way of a seamless user experience. One thing for sure is that businesses should pay attention to VR and AR trends.

Through my current internship at Howest DAE for the SIVAR project and my VUB master thesis focus on VR in the journalism field, I have been trying out different headsets, content and immersive experiences, and watching and reading about other users’ experiences as well.

When I recently saw mention of the new Asus Windows VR Headset with a flip-up visor, I got excited because it seems like a good direction to head in to allow users to jump back and forth between being present and immersed. One of the aspects I both love and hate about some of the headsets I have used so far is that you can totally lose track of where you are and not even realize there are people in the room right next to you. That might be fun for gaming or truly immersive experiences but it seems and feels unsafe and uncomfortable for a work environment, especially one that involves training.

Speaking of training, it appears to be the part of AR and VR that are already starting to take off. Consumers are more aware of VR thanks to the gaming market but only really know AR via things like Pokemon Go. For CIOs and CTOs, according to a recent article in TechRepublic, awareness of VR and AR as training tools is essential. In that article, J.P. Gownder, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester, says that businesses have to keep VR and AR tools under their radar, especially when it comes to training. In the same article, Tuong Nguyen, principal research analyst at Gartner, says that it is essential to consider which problems VR and AR tools can help solve rather than just to start guessing and trying.

Nguyen also says that task itemization, design and collaboration and video guidance are the top three uses for such technology for enterprises right now. High-risk training situations take precedence as well. In the TechRepublic article, he points out that investing in technology has to make or save a company money to make sense. CIOs, he says, should be expecting cost savings through augmented and virtual training that leads to fewer accidents and mistakes and better accuracy.

In a recent White Paper I wrote about how journalists should approach virtual reality, my conclusion was that the absolute least they should do is to keep a good eye on it and what their colleagues and competitors are doing with it – that the days of simply ignoring it are over. That seems to ring true for many fields. If you want to stay on the cutting edge and remain competitive, as Gownder said, you need to keep AR and VR tools under your radar.

And if you are a headset developer, please keep working out how to go wireless and use flip-up visors or something, anything, that makes the real world and the virtual and augmented ones easier to enter and leave, especially when it comes to training situations on the work floor.

Check out this video discussing the state of  AR and VR in both consumer and business technology.

For more information about the flip-up Asus and how TechRepublic sees it, look here: https://www.techrepublic.com/article/asus-takes-ar-to-the-enterprise-with-flip-up-windows-mixed-reality-headset/

For more insights into the use of VR and AR for training, read this: https://www.techrepublic.com/article/are-ar-and-vr-training-technologies-ready-for-the-enterprise

by Sarah Markewich – SIVAR project intern spring 2018