Magic Leap One

Er valt veel te zeggen over de Magic Leap One. Het probeert een ton eye-tracking, hand-tracking, 6DoF-controllers, real-time meshing en een aantal andere functies die nog niet eerder zijn waargenomen in een mobiel MR-apparaat. En hoewel het besturingssysteem en de apps niet volledig gebruikmaken van de technologie die voor hen beschikbaar is, is de Magic Leap One een ambitieuze, goed gemaakte, maar imperfecte MR-devkit die de hype niet helemaal waarmaakt, maar nog steeds de meest complete en betaalbare mixed-reality (MR) computer die er is.

Officiële website:
https://www.magicleap.com/

Full reviews:

Road To VR:

https://www.roadtovr.com/magic-leap-one-review/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sKYBPxo6Vg

The Verge:

https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/8/17662040/magic-leap-one-creator-edition-preview-mixed-reality-glasses-launch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2XQHLSuETs

Tested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrq2akzdFq8


News from GDC 2018

We can't begin a post about GDC without mentioning that Howest DAE was there, as usual, but this time as part of a Flemish gaming delegation led by Flemish Minister for Culture, Media, Youth and Brussels Sven Gatz, Flanders DC, FLEGA (Flemish Games Association) and about 30 Belgian gaming developers.

If you missed the recent VRT series about the GDC visit, you can read about it and watch a video from it here.

You can also see Howest Digital Arts & Entertainment Coordinator and "master chief," Rik Leenknegt talking about his favorite games and about Howest being the number one game school in the world via this article and video from the recent VRT series on gaming in Belgium.

Minister Gatz took the GDC visit opportunity to announce hopes to create a kind of tax shelter for the game industry in Flanders to encourage growth in the sector and undoubtedly to avoid brain drain of all of the talent here. Gatz also said he wants there to be a Flemish stand and more representation at next year's GDC. You can read more about it and the Flemish GDC delegation's adventures via the Flega blog.

If you want to know 5 facts about the Flemish Gaming Industry, make sure to check out the article inspired by the GDC visit from Flanders Investment and Trade.

The article mentions the following:

"Novel technologies – such as virtual and augmented realityare changing the face of the gaming industry. Luckily, Flanders provides a haven for companies trying to find their way in today’s digital maze. The region unites industrial, academic and governmental players for cross-sector collaborative projects that help shape digital society, and the gaming industry with it. Imec, Flanders’ research center for nano- and digital technology, has proven to be a particularly innovative force in these fields."

Another handy reference to get you up to date on the gaming industry as well as the current trends in VR and AR is this Game Industry Report based on as survey of 4000 game developers as a lead up to GDC 2018.

As a summary, the report states: "Significant trends revealed by the survey results include a notable uptick in interest in the Nintendo Switch, game makers’ waning opinions of VR, and a move away from mobile to focus on PC and home consoles."

Howest DAE's Rik Leenknegt agreed, saying that those he spoke with at GDC expressed that the gaming market is decreasing its focus on VR entertainment - but that the focus is now really shifting to B2B when it comes to the VR sector.

With that said, have a look at this video report from The Grid VR to see some of the GDC VR entertainment news. You'll hear about upcoming headsets with various improvements, such as the Vive Pro (due out April 3rd); the HTC Vive Focus (coming here later this year); the Oculus Go (low priced, with USB support) and the Santa Cruz. The video will also introduce you to some new games (Space Heroes) and a new VR series (Silicon Valley) and to some peeks through Leap Motion glasses. You'll hear lots of references to improved lighting, which can make a real impact on VR content. Have a look!

We'll continue with news from GDC soon but in the meantime, if you prefer text to video, you can find a detailed roundup of the highlights from GDC in this article from the "virtual reality, start up and stuff" blog The Ghost Howls.

We'll leave you with what so many have mentioned as the stand-out demo at GDC; the "live captured digital human" called "Siren". You have to see it to believe it - or maybe believe it to see it. In any case, make sure to have a look at the video. It might creep you out or excite you, depending on just how much of a futurist you are. Enjoy!

And for a little more background on Siren, watch this one too!

by Sarah Markewich – SIVAR project intern spring 2018


To See or Not to See? It's Time to Focus on AR Glasses

Augmented Reality (AR) pioneer and Intel Corporation Research Manager Ronald Azuma has said that the current most important challenge of the field is to develop useful and meaningful consumer-ready AR that goes beyond the gimmick. At the recent Electronic Imagining 2018 conference, Azuma also said that we should re-frame the challenge with AR headsets and glasses by seeing their design as an opportunity to help consumers see better.

At just under 53 minutes, Azuma’s presentation is an investment in time, but a highly recommended one whether you are an AR newcomer, user, developer or anything in between.

You can watch it here. You can also get a good overview of it via this Next Reality article.

In researching virtual reality (VR) for months, I have also had to keep up on the AR field, as you can’t talk about one without the other even though they are so different – they face similar issues. Azuma’s presentation had the clearest and most to the point information that I have come across yet. Also appealing is how down-to-earth Azuma is about the topic. So often, you hear the exaggerated marketing talk of “the best” this or “the breakthrough” that or the “real game-changer”. Azuma leaves the superlatives out speaks in a language that even non-technical people can understand.

It is getting more and more important for even the layperson to understand the potential of AR and how far it can go beyond the Pokémon Go experience.

Azuma talks about the importance and benefits of AR use for companies for training and marketing and uses that do not even exist yet. But if AR only gets picked up in the world of industry and enterprise then it will remain niche, he says. He talks about consumer uses such as creating personal stories, with his wedding as an example. He takes us to the gazebo he got married in and imagines using AR to fill it in with memories. The power of being able to fill in real spaces with meaningful objects that you can interact with could really appeal to the consumer. Azuma sees AR’s potential to connect people with everyday spaces in a personal, often small-scale, yet spectacular way.

Whether for AR or VR, the biggest complaints always come down to the headsets, the glasses, the cables and the gadgets, among other issues such as field of vision, light reflection, quality of image and so forth. Every time I put on a shared headset, I have to admit; I get kind of grossed out by the eye smears and sweat left behind by someone else on the glass and the fabric. My multifocal glasses become malformed and blurry every time I have to adjust the glasses or program, which unfortunately is a lot (but that’s for another post).

What really caught my eye in Azuma’s speech was his way of gently bursting the bubble of the AR glasses problem. Convinced that there is currently no other possibility than some sort of glasses for AR use, Azuma decides to go with it rather than fight against it. He cleverly reminds us that we use goggles for swimming; ski glasses for skiing; protective glasses on the work floor; reading glasses for reading and other glasses for other purposes. It makes you wonder why we are fighting so much against glasses in the AR world. Azuma seems to say that, at least for now, it’s time we adjust our mindset, remove all of that negativity about glasses and embrace and promote them –while improving them and everything else about AR as well, of course.

While lenses for AR placed directly on our eyes sound ideal, Azuma says we are nowhere near being able to make and market those as the expense is too big and different eyesight prescriptions make it almost impossible, at least at the moment.

Why not change our view and start to imagine our own personalized sets of AR glasses with only our eye smears and sweat on them, adjusted to our own specific eyesight?

As with most things, it’s all how you sell it. Perhaps it’s time to put the focus on how cool all these new AR glasses are going to be. Google Glasses tried and failed and created a kind of stigma around anything that might resemble them. Don’t be surprised if we end up with something that looks quite similar though hopefully works a lot better.

Speaking of AR glasses, or rather mixed-reality (MR) ones, the mysterious Magic Leap is still one of the glasses manufacturers that everyone is keeping their eye on. They promise a magical user experience through speaking to our “visual cortex” in a “biologically friendly way,” according to their CEO. But how? You may wonder. Well, check out this article via Next Reality to see what is included in the recent Magic Leap patent application. The question remains, as posed by many, if there’s more to Magic Leap than meets the eye.

by Sarah Markewich – SIVAR project intern spring 2018


Nieuw Magic Leap design patent gespot

Na een lange stilte komt er weer wat nieuws van het mysterieuze bedrijf Magic Leap naar de voorgrond. Met hun geschatte investering spaarpot van om en bij de 1.4 biljoen kennen we Magic Leap vooral van hun indrukwekkende AR/MR trailers:

Voordat iedereen te enthousiast word gaan we al vermelden dat Magic Leap al heeft bevestigd dat het patent niets te maken heeft met het prototype waar, zogezegd, momenteel aan gewerkt word. Waar het wel over gaat is een nieuwe kijk op het programma van het bedrijf. Magic Leap heeft zich altijd kritisch geuit tegenover de huidige gang van zaken in de VR industrie. Het is zoals altijd koffiedik kijken en speculeren maar zoals we zien in onderstaande afbeelding, dat onder "Virtual reality glasses" teruggevonden is, zien we mogelijks Magic Leap's visie op de volgende generatie VR brillen. Geen grote HMD's meer en misschien de mogelijkheid om ook nog een deel van de realiteit te zien door de glazen. Natuurlijk is er niets zeker, en moeten we geduldig wachten tot Magic Leap zelf eindelijk een stuk van hun technologie showcased.

(Bron: uploadvr.com)